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#61 FelipeM

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Posted 27 March 2014 - 04:49 AM

independent.co.uk - I found this on Shakira. wiki page. I remember the comments to this review but I think it wasn't posted in this topic.

Kevin Harley

Shakira Shakira (RCA)

Hip-twizzling, Game of Thrones-dressing Colombian pop star Shakira is audio Marmite. To the 60 million people whove bought her records shes a yodelling, lyrical genius. To everyone else she sounds like a strangulated sheep.

After a four-year hiatus, Shakiras 10th album is full of raggae-tinged, bouncy melodies and absurd, occasionally quite poetic lyrics: the stars make love to the universe on ballad Empire. Teaming up with Rihanna on I Cant Remember To Forget You is ironically memorable and Cut Me Deep, her collaboration with Canadian raggae-pop band Magic!, is also catchy. But Medicine, a duet with country star Blake Shelton, is a stretch too far, even by Shakiras infinitely flexible standards.

***

If you posted a review in a blog or site please share.


This had been posted already. Superficial lazy review. This guy has no idea.

#62 Lorelei

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Posted 27 March 2014 - 04:49 AM

A three-sentence review, nice  :Mohit:


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franzfergidon on Shakira being late for her concert during TSCO Tour: 

It's like HAI GUYZ I NO I KEPT U WAITIN BUT LOOK LOL, HEREZ MAI BOIFREND ISN'T HE SO KYUTE U JEAL? YEA I NO, LEMME SING ALL MAI SONGZ BOUT HIM NAO O N SRRY IF U MISS DA TRAIN HOME, DATZ NOT MY PROB, LOL. 
 

 


#63 Virgo

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Posted 27 March 2014 - 05:28 AM

Actually the album itself is getting really great reviews around the web and in publications.   The thing is you'll find a lot of copies of the same review posted in several websites.  

 

Mesfin Fekadu's review was posted on the Washington Post, the huffington post, The Minneapolis Star Tribune, The Saratogian... It's really annoying cuz it's only one guy's review.  


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#64 Virgo

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Posted 27 March 2014 - 06:15 AM

A Good review from Studlife: http://www.studlife.com/?p=68037

 

 

4 out of 5 stars

For fans of Enrique Iglesias, Britney Spears, Nelly Furtado

Singles to download: ‘You Don’t Care About Me,’ ‘Empire’ and ‘Dare (La La La)’

Shakira’s 10th studio album, “Shakira,” was released last week. This is her first English album since “She Wolf” in 2009, although she also released “Sale el Sol” in 2010 in Spanish. The eponymous album features many different sounds, as Shakira experiments with different styles including reggae, rock and folk, as well as styles she’s more used to, like pop, dance and acoustic. The songs included in the album show off the range in Shakira’s talent and abilities as a musician.

“Dare (La La La),” the final name of a track initially reported to be “Truth or Dare,” leads the album with a worldly sound. It begins reminiscent of “Waka Waka (This Time for Africa),” yet quickly transitions to the kind of club beat that pop listeners are more used to in Shakira’s music.

“Empire” has a dreamy and powerful feeling and showcases Shakira’s unique vocal qualities. The song was also recently released in promotion for the album’s preorder. “Empire” is a standout track on the album, taking Shakira’s typical style back towards rock, like some of her early music.

“Shakira” also features some cool collaborations. Shakira worked with Blake Shelton, a co-coach on NBC’s “The Voice,” to make “Medicine,” a cool country/pop/ballad crossover piece. In commentary released with the album online, Shakira says that the track had eight other versions before the album was finished. The song sounds familiar but the lyrics are a nice surprise.

The album’s lead single, “Can’t Remember to Forget You,” a collaboration with Rihanna, entered the Billboard Hot 100 at number 28, Shakira’s highest-debuting track in the U.S. to date. The song is sensual and pop-based, which helped to broaden its appeal. The album also includes a Spanish version of the song, titled “Nunca Me Acuerdo de Olvidarte,” which sounds just as great as the original, a la “She Wolf” and “Loba” of her last English release.

Though “Shakira” isn’t a concept album, many of the songs are about love. “Broken Record” and “23” are very clearly personal songs for Shakira; they have more narrative than other tracks on the album and feature a more prominent acoustic sound.

Perhaps the biggest surprise of the album, however, is “You Don’t Care About Me.” Almost an anti-love song, Shakira experiments with a more metallic and self-described “alternative” sound. As a nice contrast to the rest of the album, “You Don’t Care About Me” is a refreshing choice as the weather warms up outside and you’re looking for a cool new tune.

“Shakira” has plenty to offer, and, given the artist’s popularity on “The Voice,” the album is almost guaranteed to be a hit.


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#65 Virgo

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Posted 27 March 2014 - 06:22 AM

BC Heights: http://www.bcheights...64#.UzQyl9zZXV8

 

This is an ok review: 3 out of 5 stars

 

Unbeknown to English-speaking music lovers, Shakira had been making honest, guitar-driven Latin pop-rock long before her third album and English crossover Laundry Service. On these albums, including Donde Estan Los Ladrones?—which is considered a “rock en Espanol” classic—she proved herself to be an adapt songwriter. The albums that followed, however, lacked the same sense of personal nakedness that made her the Latina version of Taylor Swift to young Hispanic girls in the ’90s. That changed with her 2009 release of Sale el Sol, in which she returned to her Spanish-singing roots and personal songwriting. The record received rave reviews, setting high expectations for her latest release, Shakira.    

The self-titled album almost lives up to them. Its main problem is that, when listened to all the way through, it seems all over the place. That is not to say that the album doesn’t have themes or sounds that tie it together with her other albums. There are frequent sonic references to reggae and ska, which are a surprisingly nice twist to Shakira’s pop music sound. Lyrically, Shakira spends most of the record thanking her partner, and Barcelona defender, Gerard Pique. That said, the sequencing of the album makes its content seem strange.

The album opens with its only dance track, “Dare (La La La).” Featuring elements of both dubstep and ’90s house music, the song is musically and lyrically uninteresting (“Is it true that you want it / Then act like you mean it”). Furthermore, it lacks the spunk and musical intricacy of Shakira’s 2009 single “She Wolf,” which mixed electronica and violins, and featured some witty lyricism (“Not looking for cute little divas / Or rich city guys that just want to enjoy / I’m having a very good time / And behave very bad in the arms of a boy”). It’s a disappointing track, considering what Shakira can do.

Next comes the first single off the album and the first of the reggae-inspired tracks, “Can’t Remember to Forget You.” Despite a disappointing performance on the charts—the song peaked at No.15—it is a catchy tune with fast ska and escalating drums. This song marks the beginning of a strong patch of songs on the album, all taking inspiration from Bob Marley and The Wailers.

“You Don’t Care About Me” is possibly the album’s most catchy and musically inventive songs. Shakira borrows the xylophone part from Goyte’s “Somebody That I Used to Know,” and overlays it with horns and reggae guitars.

“Cut Me Deep” keeps with the reggae guitar sound, and adds the beautiful harmonies of featured artist Magic—but that’s really all the song has to offer.

While all the songs on the album have something that makes them musically interesting, few have the lyrics to match. Shakira is a better lyricist when she gets personal—as exhibited on the sing-in-the-car-with-windows-down “Spotlight,” in which she recounts the story of a girl, in her words, “hid behind a wall, piling up the bricks, hoping they would fall.” This is, of course, a personal reflection. “They can say whatever they want,” she declares. She refuses to give up her man, “even if [she] ends up blind.” The song has an amazing hook that uses the usually hipster effect of white noise over vocals. It’s a powerful application of the technique, unlike its use on the album’s second single “Empire,” which feels forced.

After “Spotlight,” the sequencing problems of the album really come to light. She follows the effects-laden track with acoustic ballad “Broken Record.” Both are good songs, but they don’t fit together. As a result, the beauty of the second song is lost, and listeners are left to make the transition between these tracks on their own.

By far the most heartfelt track on the record is “23,” in which Shakira goes so far as to declare that her partner made her believe in God and destiny. It is beautifully stark and simple, using only an acoustic guitar. Meanwhile, “Medicine,” the track before “23,” sounds as awkward as a rooster mating with a peacock. The song utilizes slide guitar, which sounds uncomfortable when paired with the vocals of fellow Voice coach Blake Shelton.

While Shakira’s album stretches pop music to its limits—adding island, Latin, and reggae in the mix—the self-titled album needs more consistency to be truly great.

 

 

 

 

 

I understand when people want cohesiveness out of an album, if not lyrically then sonically. He says the songs are good but dont make much sense together.  I find it really organic, and think the theme overall is different facets of love.  


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#66 Lorelei

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Posted 27 March 2014 - 06:28 AM

The praise for SW's lyrics is ridiculous, who the hell writes these reviews


2di0ia8.jpg

 

franzfergidon on Shakira being late for her concert during TSCO Tour: 

It's like HAI GUYZ I NO I KEPT U WAITIN BUT LOOK LOL, HEREZ MAI BOIFREND ISN'T HE SO KYUTE U JEAL? YEA I NO, LEMME SING ALL MAI SONGZ BOUT HIM NAO O N SRRY IF U MISS DA TRAIN HOME, DATZ NOT MY PROB, LOL. 
 

 


#67 Vuelve88

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Posted 27 March 2014 - 06:29 AM

In the future, I hope Shakira doesn't present albums by telling the media that she didn't write certain songs. You're supposed to give the media selling points -- not draw attention to things that could be seen as negative.

 

That was such an unnecessary statement to emphasize, and in some cases (All Music review), it was used as ammunition against the album. 


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#68 Virgo

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Posted 27 March 2014 - 06:30 AM

^ I know right?  When it came out, the critics were laughing at it for sounding silly and ridiculous. 


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#69 Virgo

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Posted 27 March 2014 - 06:35 AM

Review by the Art Desk http://www.theartsde...shakira-shakira

 

 

3 out of 5 stars. 

 

The other day I woke up with Shakira’s “Hips Don’t Lie” fracking my mind. Round and round it juddered, wouldn’t leave me alone - horrid production, killer chorus - and much too much of that bloke whose career used to be endlessly repeating, “One time, one time” on Fugees tunes. Turns out it’s not just me. “Hips Don’t Lie” is globally the best-selling song of this century. When I discovered that fact, it fried my head.

Then again, it’s possible for Europeans to forget what a massive deal Shakira is, one of the top-earning female entertainers of all time. The petite Colombian burst out of the Spanish-speaking market in spectacular style with her fifth album, Laundry Service, in 2001, and has been at the top of the tree ever since, especially, of course in the American markets, north and south. Unlike peers such as Lady Gaga, Rihanna, Britney and their billion wannabes, however, Shakira has not succumbed to increasingly predictable, twinge-inducing, post-EDM homogeno-pop.

Shakira dips a toe in that world with “Dare (La La La)”,  a ridiculously catchy co-write with Swedish pop Svengali Max Martin, but mostly, while retaining a clean stadium sheen, her music is much more fun and relatively adventurous, from the calypso-tinted Rihanna collaboration “Can’t Remember To Forget You” to the reggae pulse of “Cut Me Deep” to weirdly effective cartoon funk-rockers such as “Nunca Me Acuerdo De Olividarte” and “Empire”.

Shakira always seems more “real” than most of the girl-pop brigade, a woman with a fierce intellect who has hands-on input into her music, and who engages with the world around her at more than lip service level. Her music is equally passionate. The last three years have seen her romance with the younger Spanish footballer, Gerard Piqué, blossom and he appears to be her new muse. The many upbeat love songs here are grounded and full of fire, the likes of “The One Thing”, “23” and “Broken Record”. That fact she can make such soppy fare so persuasive speaks volumes about her and why Shakira has such a likeable spiritedness.

Overleaf: Watch the video for Shakira & Rihanna "I Can't Remember To Forget You"


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#70 E

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Posted 27 March 2014 - 06:49 AM

the reviews are so bad because the album isn't latin sounding and she's supposed to be the latin artist who makes catchy dancy latin music a la loca. 



#71 RLW

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Posted 27 March 2014 - 06:53 AM

and as far as negativity goes, all the critics have to do is come in here for ammunition



#72 Virgo

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Posted 27 March 2014 - 07:57 AM

Review From NeonTommy: http://www.neontommy...ra-album-review

 

Rave Review: 

 

What's the first thing that comes to mind when you think of Shakira? "Hips Don't Lie," duh (along with a swiveling of her body so enviable that we can only dream of moving like that).

 

Needless to say, Shakira has come a long way since her "Hips Don't Lie" days back in 2001, with her constant booty-shaking hits that one can't help but dance to. On her self-titled tenth album, "Shakira.," which has already debuted as #1 in 60 countries, Shakira experiments with various styles of music and shows a more mature side to her, keeping in mind that she is older and now has a family.

Although this new album is slower and more emotional, the songs still allow for the portrayal of a vocal ability and sensuality that is undeniably Shakira. 

The album opens with "Dare (La La La)," which has recently been revealed to be the theme of the 2014 World Cup, and rightfully so. The song combines a catchy dance beat as well as playful, alluring lyrics that seem to transport the listener to a wild party on the beaches of Brazil. This fun tune is sure to be a summer hit when the World Cup begins, playing on repeat both on the radio and in all the European clubs.

"Dare (La La La)" then transitions into "Can't Remember to Forget You," a duet with pop singer Rihanna released in mid-January. The song has a mix of subtle reggae notes as well as some rock elements, which culminate in a sultry, yet upbeat, track describing a guy that the two singers just can't let go of. The music video is just as seductive as the song, accurately depicting the alluring vibe that the entire album encompasses.

 

In her track commentary, Shakira described the next song, "Empire," as "very grand and epic, and at the same time intimate." The track includes piano and profound echoes in Shakira's voice, and there is an interesting contrast between soft notes and big, bold ones. This eccentric mix results in a cosmic sound, appropriately accompanied by celestial lyrics, such as "And the stars make love to the universe/You're my wildfire every single night/We are alive."

"You Don't Care About Me" has an alternative sound, paired with angst-y lyrics about a toxic and unreciprocated love. The track has a steady and consistent beat, which comes across as somewhat boring in comparison to the rest of the album. It should not be neglected, though, for it portrays Shakira's multifaceted abilities and musical curiosity. 

Along the same lines of experimenting with new genres, "Cut Me Deep," which features Canadian reggae-pop band Magic!, begins with a strong reggae style and eventually incorporates some rock with guitar instrumentals that are reminiscent of "Loca" from her 2010 album, "Sale el Sol." Reggae works incredibly well with Shakira's rich, Latin voice and provides a fun, laid-back track with a catchy beat that the listener finds him or herself inevitably swaying side to side with.

The next few songs on the album are clearly personal and written about the important people in Shakira's life. "Spotlight," "Broken Record," and "23" are profound love songs about her partner, Gerard Pique. "23," which tells the story of the time she met Pique and her belief that he is her destiny, has sweet lyrics which are heightened by the light acoustic guitar and a drum beat that almost sounds like a pounding heart. The track even ends with a baby (presumably her son) cooing, which adds to the delight of the song.

Similarly, "Broken Record" describes her love for her partner and also includes acoustic guitar. The instrumentals become stronger at the chorus and the bridge, which makes the listener truly feel the passion Shakira has for Pique. "Spotlight," which is a heavier rock song, according to Shakira, explains "the exposure that [she] and [Pique] are constantly under" but that their love is so strong, it is unfazed by the constant attention. These three tracks are refreshing, for they provide an insight into Shakira's new life and her true love for her partner, feelings that many people will undoubtedly relate to.

"Medicine," written by some of the top country songwriters in Nashville, is yet another manifestation of Shakira's desire to experiment, for she mentioned to Ryan Seacrest on his radio show that she recorded it eight times before coming to the conclusion that it must be a country song. The track is a duet with hit country singer Blake Shelton, whose rustic voice adds to the country vibe. Although it is natural to believe that Shakira's strong voice will clash with Shelton's, the track actually works quite nicely and allows for a smooth country-rock song.

"The One Thing" is a stand-out on the record, for it is another personal track, which has an upbeat, pop-rock sound that reminds the listener of Shakira's previous work (think "Whenever, Wherever" off her 2001 album, "Laundry Service"). The song was written about her son, Milan, which the lyrics describe is the one perfect thing in her world.

The last two songs are in Spanish, which is a must to include on a Shakira album. "Nunca Me Acuerdo de Olvidarte" is the Spanish version of "Can't Remember to Forget You," and allows Shakira to sing the lyrics more passionately in her native language and seemingly make the entire song sound richer. "Loca por Ti" is a love ballad, which sounds similar to her 2009 hit, "Gypsy." Even non-Spanish speakers can feel the sensuality and emotion in her voice and the track is a perfect ending to an overall romantic record.

In general, Shakira's new album proves her musical versatility and fearlessness. Although she makes a few nods to her previous albums, she is more mature and the record is overall unlike anything she has done before, giving fans everywhere an insight into Shakira's mind and life while still providing songs that will be stuck in their heads for days.


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#73 Virgo

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Posted 27 March 2014 - 07:59 AM

Another Rave review from 34th Street Magazine: http://34st.com/2014...review-shakira/

 

 

“Shakira:” Shakira

It’s been almost four years since we’ve heard new music from Shakira, but her new material is worth the wait. The Colombian singer’s tenth studio album starts strong and never really loses steam. The album feels fresh, with electronic, tribal and reggaeton influences galore wrapped in polished pop. You can hear her experimenting with her music, throwing out some great dance tracks as well as some slower, moodier songs like “Empire.” Overall, Shakira has updated her sound and provided a strong, Latin–influenced pop album for old fans and curious newcomers alike.

 

Grade: A

Download: “Dare (La La La)”

Sounds best when: Spring has begun, the sun is up and you’re getting ready for a dager.


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#74 Nick Nifty

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Posted 27 March 2014 - 08:11 AM

ontheredcarpet.com

It's been nearly four years since Shakira released an album, and in that time, the Columbian pop singer has experienced a number of personal and professional changes -- ones that are evident on her 10th studio record.

By the time she released her last album, 2010's "Sale el Sol," Shakira was a renowned global sensation in music, amassing numerous hits over the span of a decade that included "Whenever, Wherever," "Hips Don't Lie," "She Wolf" and the World Cup-assisted hit "Waka Waka."

With her continued success as an artist came success in her personal life, as she began dating Spanish football player Gerard Pique and later welcomed their first son together, Milan, in January 2013. Additionally, Shakira is serving as a coach on the popular NBC singing competition show "The Voice," where she mentors new artists into achieving the same dream of being a global singing sensation.

On "Shakira," her first self-titled album in her career, the singer blends an array of musical flavors that are familiar to albums of the past, only this time bringing together all in one, eclectic package. Mixing a little bit of dance-pop, Spanish, reggae and rock influences, "Shakira" provides fans with a glimpse into the way she loves, both in her relationship and as a mother.

"Shakira" is currently available for digital download on iTunes. Check out a track-by-track review of the standard edition of the album below.

1. "Dare (La La La)" - The album opens with a straight up electro-pop dance jam. The song describes a scene in which she and a man she finds attractive interact on the dance floor, an attraction neither of them can deny. Lyrics for the song include, "Is it true that you love me / I dare you to kiss me." Reminiscent of past electro-pop hits like "Give It Up to Me," the song has a grimy, sweltering feel to it that will make it a favorite among global club-goers.

2. "Can't Remember to Forget You" featuring Rihanna - Released as the album's first single, Shakira trades verses with fellow pop diva Rihanna in what can only be describes as one of the hottest female collaborations in recent years. The two sing about a man that caused them trouble in the past, but despite all the turmoil, they can't shake him no matter how hard they try. The song touches on influences both singers are known for, by incorporating reggae-sounding tinges in the up-tempo track. In addition to having a sexy music video, the song is a standout on the album.

3. "Empire" - Shakira begins the song with raw vocals over a piano, showcasing her truly unique vocal abilities. The song's slow first verse builds to a strong, loud stadium rock-sounding power ballad, which finds the singer channeling Coldplay-style vocal effects. Lyrically, the song is about two people who have an attraction so strong and so profound, that they are like two empires forming as one. The song is special for its live capabilities, one that can be stripped down and one that will make for memorable stadium-wide sing-alongs.

4. "You Don't Care About Me" - Shakira may be in love in real life, but she's not afraid to call out a lover who wronged her in the past. The song describes a relationship in which her lover won't let her go, despite her making it clear things were not working out. Lyrics for the song include, "Before you came along it was all beautiful / I have nothing left in my heart, in my soul / Should have never helped you become so powerful / But I saw a champion in your eyes." While it is not a standout track on the album, the song is a necessary layer to the album overall.

5. "Cut Me Deep" featuring MAGIC! - In one of the album's more obvious reggae-influenced tracks, Shakira sings about a relationship that was so strong that it has left both parties scared and deeply changed. The song is reminiscent of sounds perfected by No Doubt in their early years, making the song part nostalgic for the song while maintaining a current, eclectic vibe to it. By including the reggae band MAGIC! on the track, "Cut Me Deep" has a true authenticity to it the other reggae-sounding pop songs don't have, making it a standout on the album.

6. "Spotlight" - Channeling her inner Avril Lavigne with a blend of electro-pop and rock, Shakira sings about not giving up her feelings of love for a particular person. Lyrics for the song include, "Here is my life in the spotlight / And it's hurting my eyes 'cause it's so bright / But you are the thing I was missing, that I couldn't find / And I wouldn't give up even if I end up blind." When stacked up against prior tracks on the album, this mid-way track perfectly gives listeners a look at just how varied the sounds are on the record.

7. "Broken Record" - In another song that showcases her unique vocals, Shakira sings about reaffirming someone she loves of her affection, having said so "700 times." Taking on a more stripped down, acoustic feel, the song is perhaps one of the most relatable on the album, as she tackles the topic of insecurities that go unspoken in a relationship. Unlike many of her contemporaries, when Shakira does acoustic, she sounds sincere and genuine in both her vision of the song and the delivery. For its candor and stripped down arrangement, the song is a standout on the album.

8. "Medicine" featuring Blake Shelton - Things get a little bit country when Shakira teams up with her sparring partner on "The Voice," country superstar Blake Shelton. The song, which uses love as a metaphor for medicine, the two use drinking analogies for coping with pain, with Shakira singing, "I reach for the bottle of whiskey," while Shelton replies, "Straight, on the rocks." Fans of "The Voice" will find the lyric amusing, considering Shakira constantly pokes fun at Shelton's love for drinking on the show. Shakira's voice lends well to the country-inspired track, and it's nice to hear the two singers not "fighting" for once.

9. "23" - Shakira sings about falling in love on this track, possibly about her boyfriend Gerard Pique. Lyrically, the song describes a time when the singer didn't think love was possible, until she met the man of her dreams. She sings, "A couple years ago I was lonely / I used to think that there was no God / But then you looked at me with your blue eyes / And my agnosticism turned into dust." It should be noted that Pique has blue eyes and met Shakira around the time he was 23. The song is a special peek into her personal life, and even features a special shout from her and Pique's son, Milan.

10. "The One Thing" - In the album's final English track, Shakira sings about the unexplainable love she has for her son Milan. Lyrics include, "You are the one thing that I got right / It's a fickle world, it's a fickle world / You turned the darkness into sunlight / I'm a lucky girl, yeah I'm a lucky girl." Pop stars who become mothers will often sing about how their new baby has changed their life in a unique way, in many ways to be able to relate with their growing fans. Shakira does this with charm and light, all the while giving fans an opportunity to dance.

11. "Nunca Me Acuerdo de Olvidarte" - As the Spanish version of "Can't Remember To Forget You," Shakira takes full command of the vocals, giving the already cool and sexy song new life. The singer will often releases Spanish versions of her popular English hits, showing truly how versatile her appeal is across the world.

12. "Loca por Ti" - In the album's Spanish closing number, Shakira singing about being crazy for the person she loves and drinking to love in a celebratory manner. With one final ode to love on an album that also explores lust, loss and regret, Shakira appears to have come full circle in her quest for love. As a mother, partner and performer, Shakira exudes a confidence with a softness that makes her stand out among her contemporaries, but in a non-threatening way that allows her fans to feel personally connected to her on-stage and off.


Love this positive review from a casual listener not a Stan. I love this track list too from the digital version. It flows best imo
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#75 Nick Nifty

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Posted 27 March 2014 - 08:18 AM

BC Heights: http://www.bcheights...64#.UzQyl9zZXV8
 
This is an ok review: 3 out of 5 stars
 
Unbeknown to English-speaking music lovers, Shakira had been making honest, guitar-driven Latin pop-rock long before her third album ...
 
 
 
I understand when people want cohesiveness out of an album, if not lyrically then sonically. He says the songs are good but dont make much sense together.  I find it really organic, and think the theme overall is different facets of love.  


Love? Would be a good title if jlo didn't use it
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#76 DavDan

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Posted 27 March 2014 - 09:01 AM

Here's a good review by the New York Times:

 

“Shakira” (RCA/Sony Latin Iberia) is a determined hit seeker, with nearly all its songs in English. It’s full of collaborations with songwriters and producers who have also abetted Justin Bieber, Britney Spears, One Direction and Carrie Underwood. The first single, “Can’t Remember to Forget You,” has guest vocals from the near-ubiquitous Rihanna, along with a ska-to-punk-pop buildup reminiscent of No Doubt.

“Shakira” is a style-hopping album that leaps from electronic dance music to reggae to folk-pop to distorted rock to, well, current country (in “Medicine,” a duet with Shakira’s fellow coach on “The Voice,” Blake Shelton). There’s some efficient sonic gimmickry, like the explosive mostly wordless chorus of“Empire,” along with glimmers of autobiography like “The One Thing,” praising the son that Shakira had in 2013 with her boyfriend the soccer player Gerard Pique. But the endearing parts of “Shakira” are the quirks that still separate her from North American pop singers: the warbles and breaks in her voice that make her professions of love sound both innocent and obsessive, and the idiosyncrasies of her English lyrics: “You looked at me with your blue eyes/And my agnosticism turned into dust.” They keep her from getting entirely swallowed by the Anglo pop machine.

 

http://www.nytimes.c...wisin.html?_r=0


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#77 Virgo

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Posted 27 March 2014 - 09:22 AM

Here's a good review by the New York Times:

 

“Shakira” (RCA/Sony Latin Iberia) is a determined hit seeker, with nearly all its songs in English. It’s full of collaborations with songwriters and producers who have also abetted Justin Bieber, Britney Spears, One Direction and Carrie Underwood. The first single, “Can’t Remember to Forget You,” has guest vocals from the near-ubiquitous Rihanna, along with a ska-to-punk-pop buildup reminiscent of No Doubt.

“Shakira” is a style-hopping album that leaps from electronic dance music to reggae to folk-pop to distorted rock to, well, current country (in “Medicine,” a duet with Shakira’s fellow coach on “The Voice,” Blake Shelton). There’s some efficient sonic gimmickry, like the explosive mostly wordless chorus of“Empire,” along with glimmers of autobiography like “The One Thing,” praising the son that Shakira had in 2013 with her boyfriend the soccer player Gerard Pique. But the endearing parts of “Shakira” are the quirks that still separate her from North American pop singers: the warbles and breaks in her voice that make her professions of love sound both innocent and obsessive, and the idiosyncrasies of her English lyrics: “You looked at me with your blue eyes/And my agnosticism turned into dust.” They keep her from getting entirely swallowed by the Anglo pop machine.

 

http://www.nytimes.c...wisin.html?_r=0

 

 

OMG! this is great!!!!

Getting a good review from the NY times is huge!!! For some reason a lot of other people and critics usually follow the same opinion as NY times.  I was waiting for this review to come =)  


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#78 Valdo Cooper

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Posted 27 March 2014 - 09:22 AM

^Finally some coherent review.

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¿Conoces Al Fenómeno? ¿Conoces A La Mujer?

 

Dolce Far Niente

 

 

 

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#79 Dexter_Shak

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Posted 27 March 2014 - 09:39 AM

In metacritic the Boston Globe review has a score of 70, but in the site I don't see how they got that score, I don't find any number... Neither 3.5/5 or 7/10... Can someone help me?

#80 Dexter_Shak

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Posted 27 March 2014 - 10:32 AM

Positive Reviews:
* 34th Street Magazine - 10/10
* Newsday - 9.1/10
* Billboard - 8.8/10
* USA Today - 8.7/10
* Digital Spy - 8/10
* Idolator - 8/10
* Examiner - 8/10
* Studlife - 8/10
* Direct Lyrics - 7.4/10
* All Music - 7/10
* Boston Globe - 7/10
* New York Times - 7/10
* The Independent - 6/10
* BC Heights - 6/10
* Art Desk - 6/10
* El Heraldo
* Washington Post
* On The Red Carpet
* NeonTommy

Negative Reviews:
* Entertainment.ie - 4/10
* LA Times - 3.7/10
* ABC News

Favorable Reception: 86%
Average Score: 7.2/10

Edited by Dexter_Shak, 27 March 2014 - 10:32 AM.


#81 Gianfranco

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Posted 27 March 2014 - 11:36 AM

Im waiting for Rolling Stone's review.


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#82 DavDan

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Posted 27 March 2014 - 03:30 PM

It's not an official review but it's a very good review and very well written !

http://www.theskylin...-album-shakira/

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#83 DavDan

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Posted 27 March 2014 - 06:41 PM

Another good review from a university journal:

 

http://unewsonline.c...make-you-shake/


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#84 Nick Nifty

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Posted 27 March 2014 - 08:55 PM

Another good review from a university journal:
 
http://unewsonline.c...make-you-shake/


Yes that is quite amateur and no one will read it
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#85 DavDan

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Posted 27 March 2014 - 08:58 PM

Yes that is quite amateur and no one will read it


Yeah ! I know but when I read a good review that makes me feel happy ! :)

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#86 FelipeM

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Posted 27 March 2014 - 09:32 PM

Funny that in metacritic SES has such high score (with only 5 reviews). That album was way overrated by non Spanish speaking critics IMO.

Waiting to see Important reviews such as Q, RS, Variety, EW and Spin.

Edited by FelipeM, 27 March 2014 - 09:45 PM.


#87 cufnc

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Posted 28 March 2014 - 02:57 AM

I really like the Los Angeles Times review because it's clearly written by a man who is a fan of Shakira's and understands all that she is capable of. He knows (as we all do) that she can do better than this, especially for an album that has is named after herself.

 

 


 

Shakira

"Shakira"

(RCA/Sony Latin Iberia)

One and a half stars

 

Not enough Shakira in 'Shakira'
The singer's usual quirks and unusual style have been smoothed out of her new album in favor of a disappointing commercial sound.
 
By Mikael Wood

March 26, 2014, 5:30 a.m.

There's only one place where a duet between Shakira and Blake Shelton makes sense, and that's inside an executive suite at NBC, the network that brings the two stars together every week as celebrity coaches on "The Voice."

You certainly don't hear anything beyond corporate synergy at work in "Medicine," a deeply unconvincing collaboration that somehow made the cut for Shakira's new, self-titled album. Trading lines over a chipper pop-country arrangement embroidered with ready-made banjo licks, the singers feebly declare that each is the cure for what ails the other.

"If I want the pain to go away, in a second make it fade," they insist, "You're the only thing that will." Well, maybe on TV.

As chemistry-free as "Medicine" sounds, it's just one of many songs that poorly present Shakira's talent on this disappointing album, the follow-up to the singer's excellent 2010 disc "Sale el Sol" and her first record since she became a mother last year.

 

With tinkling piano giving way to a booming parade beat, the swollen "Empire" sounds like Shakira doing a bad impression of Alicia Keys. "Dare (La La La)" sets lyrics about getting drunk on some guy's eyes to a standard-issue club track from Dr. Luke.

And "Can't Remember to Forget You" pairs Shakira with Rihanna for a duet that could've become something more organic than "Medicine" but ends up feeling just as focus-grouped.

Predictable and flavorless, these songs seem to realize a fear that unfairly gathered around Shakira in 2009 when her album "She Wolf" led some critics to suspect that the Colombian-born star was attempting to Americanize her sound (or had been coerced into doing so by forces in the music industry).

Even with unapologetically hit-seeking production by Timbaland and the Neptunes, though, that album preserved much of Shakira's unique appeal — her yelpy vocals, for instance, and a flair for peppering high-flown lyrics with little bursts of the everyday.

"Shakira," by contrast, actually does feel like an effort to smooth out her quirks, to fit her into stylistic slots otherwise occupied by, say, Taylor Swift ("Broken Record"), Pink ("Spotlight") or Kelly Clarkson ("The One Thing").

 

But more than a decade after her song "Whenever, Wherever" established her in the United States, Shakira's own brand has proved no less durable than those other pop stars. (Three words: "Hips Don't Lie.") So it's unclear why she'd change course now.

One reason might be the newfound fulfillment in her personal life — an inspiration-killer, perhaps, for an artist who's written vividly about romantic frustration in songs such as "La Tortura" and "Men in This Town," which laments the lack of suitable prospects in Los Angeles.

Here she's reduced in "23" to describing the beginning of her relationship with the Spanish soccer player Gerard Piqué this way: "I knew we had something from the moment I met you / I knew we had something, no one thought it could be true." (The tune ends with the satisfied gurgle of their infant son.)

She's scarcely better in "The One Thing," where the singer says her lover "turned the darkness into sunlight" — a pretty weak metaphor from a women who once memorably complained of feeling "just a little abused, like a coffee machine in an office."

Yet the idea that contentment equals creative stasis suggests that Shakira is incapable of drawing on her imagination, which obviously isn't the case. Indeed, the two finest songs on "Shakira" take up the kind of emotional turmoil she appears to have excised from her happy existence.

 

In "You Don't Care About Me," she sketches a scene of poisoned domesticity with smart, brutal details over a sinister electro-folk groove. "I fold your T-shirts and I strip your bed," she sings, "I loved you perfect, but there's no appreciation."

She's more pointed still in the sharp-angled reggae tune "Cut Me Deep," asking, "Why do you fill up my wounds with your dirt?"

There are glimmers of her old peculiarity elsewhere, as when she sings in "Broken Record" that "I can get lost climbing on your legs that never end." And though the album's lead single feels like a marketing initiative come to life, "Can't Remember to Forget You" has some beautiful guitar sounds, as tart and fizzy as ginger ale.

But you know a Shakira record isn't doing what it should be when you find yourself paying attention to the guitar player.

mikael.wood@latimes.com

http://www.latimes.c...y#ixzz2xFnfEKU8


Edited by cufnc, 28 March 2014 - 03:01 AM.

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#88 Lorelei

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Posted 28 March 2014 - 03:02 AM

 

 the follow-up to the singer's excellent 2010 disc "Sale el Sol"

 

Stopped reading.

ahh.gifahh.gifahh.gif

Not SES described as "excellent" i mean, c'mon man, are you serious? hahahaha


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franzfergidon on Shakira being late for her concert during TSCO Tour: 

It's like HAI GUYZ I NO I KEPT U WAITIN BUT LOOK LOL, HEREZ MAI BOIFREND ISN'T HE SO KYUTE U JEAL? YEA I NO, LEMME SING ALL MAI SONGZ BOUT HIM NAO O N SRRY IF U MISS DA TRAIN HOME, DATZ NOT MY PROB, LOL. 
 

 


#89 Virgo

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Posted 28 March 2014 - 05:20 AM

I agree that Sale el Sol is incredibly overrated by American standards.  It's what Americans think Latin Music should sound like and what THEY assume Shakira was at the beginning. In truth, Sale el sol was not Shakira returning to her roots (as she had said while promoting it), she was once again experimenting with distinctively latin sounds, while adding her touches of rock and balladry here and there.  I find "Shakira" far closer to her original 90s acoustic rock and espa~nol sound, and the reason i love it so so so much is because she brought it back (successfully so) to the American market.  =D 

 

 

Anyways, here's another review. Metro in the UK = 3/5 stars http://metro.co.uk/2...-force-4680725/

 

SHAKIRA IS STILL A UNIQUE POP FORCE

For a moment there, Shakira had us worried. After a 2012 collaboration with the dreaded Pitbull and rumours of an Afrojack-produced, EDM-heavy comeback, it seemed as though the new mother could be about to drop a Britney Jean-style bomb on us.

But this tenth album is, instead, a characteristically genre-hopping selection of dance, ska, country and rock-infused pop songs – all reinforcing the sense that Shakira is one of our most intelligent and unforcedly eccentric female megastars.

The album’s one rave-pop moment comes with Dare (La La La) but, with an unpredictable structure courtesy of the likes of Dr Luke and Max Martin, it’s actually quite a stormer. Elsewhere, there’s a dub lollop to Cut Me Deep and a new wave/reggae rock feel to the Rihanna-featuring lead single, Can’t Remember To Forget You – which, while not a patch on Shak’s epic Beyoncé duet, Beautiful Liar, is still a decent blast of girl power. Much of the rest of the album reverts to Shakira’s pop-rock roots – most notably in the surging power ballad Empire, or the foot stomps and claps-sampling The One Thing, redolent of Kelly Clarkson.

There are a few duff notes, particularly in the damply gloopy country duet Medicine (with Blake Shelton), and no obvious mega-smash singles to rival the likes of Hips Don’t Lie. By releasing a self-titled album at this stage in her career, Shakira perhaps invites comparison with a certain rival star – but while there’s nothing on here as brilliant and out there as there is to be found on Beyoncé, Shakira is still a unique pop force.


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#90 Eli Is Royalty

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Posted 28 March 2014 - 05:26 AM

the reviews are so bad because the album isn't latin sounding and she's supposed to be the latin artist who makes catchy dancy latin music a la loca. 

Sis ikr? Like wtf are these idiotic reviews, mad cause there's no latin sounds? Dumb bitches tbh.

 

tumblr_luhl2ominH1r0lpji.gif 


And the stars make sex to the universe tbh





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